Cornhole – A Fun Family Game

As a parent, it's both sad and exciting to see how fast your babies grow up. Once they reach a certain age, they can never return to a younger one. Memories are great to share and think back on, but to relive them, that's often another story.

Games, however, are something that, if chosen correctly, can be used with all of your children, as they grow, from the time they are toddlers. Getting a couple of cornhole sets when your youngest children are very young can introduce them to this simple but very fun game that can give your family years of fun. If taken care of, a good set will last through the years, long enough to be enjoyed by your grandchildren, too.

Other games that your family can enjoy no matter their age aren't as compact. Table-top tennis, badminton, croquet, and others like them require much more equipment to be invested in. Rackets and mallets take a beating, or dish one out, and while table-top tennis is designed for the indoors, the other two are not. Being able to take a game outside, or play it inside, counts, as does being portable.

Having a game of cornholes on hand is also much safer than the traditional horseshoes when camping with kids. Bean bags are a lot nicer if they fall on your foot, they won't rust, and they never make a clinking noise that will bother your camping neighbors. You won't have to worry about someone tripping and falling on the horseshoe stake, either!

Another plus if that when kids are running around, accidents do happen. The impact from a bean bag most likely will hurt, but never as much as a piece of metal can. The same goes for wandering pets, also.

One drawback that the game of cornholes has, though, is that bean bags are a favorite for teething babies and puppies when they want something to chew on. A bean bag's contents are not something that you want either to end up swallowing, so make sure to keep them out of reach when they aren't being used. While you might not need to replace the box part of the game set, bean bags can wear out and get threadbare when handled enough.

The box can be cleaned up fairly easily, just wipe it down with a damp cloth and let it air dry. Bean bags, though, need to be hand washed and then immediately air-dried on a clothes line, especially if they are made with real beans. Allowing them to remain wet for any length of time can lead to the beans sprouting! The trick is to get them dry again as soon as you can when they've been washed.

Check each bean bag over for small tears or seams coming undone, too. Sewing these problems up can give you a while longer with them, but making new bean bags is not at all difficult. You can pick your own fabric patterns, and even change the shape of the bean bags if you want something new and unusual. To keep those memories going, one great idea that some of the moms who I know have used is to make memory bean bags. Just use the fabric from a pair of shorts, jeans, or a shirt from each child, and sew away – instead of a quilt, make bean bags!

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